Domaine Louis Michel et Fils

Artisan wine growers and makers of great Chablis since 1850.


Since 1850, the Michel family has been making elegant wines in the Chablis region, some of which are highly sought after by wine connoisseurs. The mostly grand cru and premier cru vineyards stretch over 25 hectares of prime plots on the slopes of Chablis. The vineyards were first cultivated by Cistercian monks in the 11th century. The Michel family made the bold decision to abandon barrel aging more than forty years ago and now produce pure, clean, and crisp Chablis wines without any wood. Because of this approach and their sensible viticultural practices, the estate's wines have become a reference for tank aging.


Wine is made in the vineyard, say Jean-Loup and William Michel, who always keep this principle in mind when they work the vines. Each plot is maintained to ensure sustainability, and yields are limited to optimize the quality of the grapes. Starting the harvest at the right time is also crucial, especially in Chablis where the fruit retains high acidity. The wines are handled as little as possible during vinification and aging, which takes place in steel tanks and can extend up to 18 months for the grand crus. Louis Michel wines are pure terroir.


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Domaine Louis Michel et Fils Wines

About the region

Chablis in Burgundy

Chablis, a mineral terroir that shows another side of Chardonnay

The vineyards of Chablis form a “wine island” of approximately 4,700 hectares surrounded by twenty Burgundian villages where only Chardonnay is grown. The appellation is located 150 km northeast of Dijon in the department of Yonne and has an enviable reputation thanks to its refreshing and long-lived style of white wine. Here, we find dry white wines with purity of flavours and minerals derived from a stony soil of clay and limestone rich in fossilized oysters. As in Champagne, spring frosts threaten the vines, but the challenging climate produces fascinating results.

A good Chablis wine is a pure delight. It has a yellow color with reflections of green, and scents of flint and citrus that, with age, evolve towards brioche, hazelnut, and butter – typical characteristics of the Kimmeridgian soil. In the mouth, there’s a harmonious and balanced combination of acidity and roundness of the body.

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